Harihareshwar Temple

Harihareshwar temple, the main attraction of Harihareshwar apart from the Harihareshwar beach, from a tourist perspective, is quite a simple structure with traditional tiled roofing. There is a small garden on the left as one enters the temple complex. The Harihareshwar temple complex opens up to a long stretch of beach to its north where the shorter 'pradakshina marg' culminates.

Harihareshwar temple with the main dieties as Brahma Vishnu and Shiva is believed to be from the 16th century. Kuladaivat or the family deity of the Peshwas, Harihareshwar temple complex was renovated by them in 1723. The steps of the pradakshina marg around the temple was built by Chandrarao More.

Harihareshwar Temple

Harihareshwar Temple

Harihareshwar temple

Believed to be built in late medieval period, the main deity of the Harihareshwar temple is the kuladaivat of the Peshwas, the prime ministers of the Maratha Empire. 'Pradakshina Marg' around the temple was built by Chandrarao More. Chatrapati Shivaji Maharaj has also visited the Harihareshwar temple. Later, the temple was renovated 1723 by Bajirao Peshwa I after Harihareshwar temple was almost destroyed in a fire.

Harihareshwar temple

There is a small garden on the left as one enters the Harihareshwar temple. The Ganapati and Maruti temples are located near the Garden. There is also a well known as Brahmakoop here. Nearby are two deepmalas which are twenty feet high. In front is the Shri Harihareshwar Temple and next to it is the Kalbhairav Temple. All the temples are tiled in traditional manner. One has to first worship at the Kalbhairav temple before going further.

Agasti caves - Harihareshwar

Four kilometers from the Harharihareshwar temple lies the Agasti caves. They are accessible by walking along the harihareshwar seashore. The entire circuit from Harihareshwar temple to Agasti caves is around 8 Kms and covers the 12 Banyans and Morgiri. One must be prepared to walk the entire distance to visit the caves, as there is no other mode of transportation. Pradakshina and the caves complete Harihareshwar pilgrimage.

Harihareshwar Temple Pradakshina

The Harihareshwar parikrama goes round the Harihareshwar temple and crosses across its four hills. The route is challenging, especially during high tides, when the sea water surges up, covering parts of the route, and making it impossible to complete the parikrama. The temple is located on a hill, to start the the parikrama, the path descends towards the Arabian Sea. Gayatri Tirth, is the first teerth that can be seen on the right side. From there descend the 70 steps cut into the laterite rock that lead to the shore. Walk down Vishnugiri hill. Here one comes across Shuklateertha. Nearby there are a number of other teerthas (ponds) that are named in the Puranas. Gayatri, Shool, Chakra, Naag, Gautam, Kamandalu, Kaamdhenu, Gauri and Pandav Teertha - Pandavas are beleived to have performed the Pind Daan in honour of their father here.

The waves along the Harihareshwar Parikrama route have cut small caves and niches into the rocks. In one of the caves, sweet water flows out of one of the crevices. A natural Aum is carved just above this spot. There are other carved sculptures inside the caves in this parikrama route, and in one such cave there resides a beautiful shivaling.

Situated on the Shivachi tekdi, lies a narrow channel approx 3 feet wide, that is called Ganesh Gully. At the end of the channel a Ganesh figure is etched on the rock to its left. During high tides, the Ganesh is submerged in the sea water. It is visible only during low tides as the Ganesh is submerged in the water during high tides. Nonetheless, the place is worth a visit even during high tides as it provides fantastic views against rocky backdrop.

Harihareshwar Temple History

Although Harihareshwar is an ancient place, the temple one sees today is from the Peshwa period. An inscription at the Kalbhairav temple records that it was renovated by the Peshwa in 1723. Chandrarao More of Javali built the steps. Shivaji Mahraj had visited Harihareshwar in 1674 while Samarth Ramdas Swami came here after visiting Mahableshwar.

At the end of the Peshwai, from 1818 to 1841 the temple was being looked after by the British. In 1842 a managing committee was formed till a trust was created in 1953.

Harihareshwar Temple